Currently Browsing: writing

Making Speech Visible

FINALLY! My book, Making Speech Visible, is done and published!  It has been a major preoccupation for the last year.  I have tried to synthesize my 35 years of reading research into a simple and readable book for parents and educators.

I am 74 this year, and there comes a time when you want to put what you have learned into the hands of others.  So, Making Speech Visible is also biographical. It includes short vignettes about how I got interested in reading research and what people said to me along the way to move me in one direction or another.  I have pursued this one path most of my life—finding and communicating evidence that writing is the best path to reading.

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A Call to Improve Reading with Writing

child writingI want to recommend a new report from the Carnegie Corporation of NY called WRITING TO READ: New Evidence for How Writing Can Improve Reading. It is an urgent call to include more writing across the curriculum. According to findings from the 2007 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 34 percent of 4th grade students and 43 percent of 8th grade students score at the “basic” level, (only partial mastery of grade level reading) and 33 percent of 4th graders and 26 percent of 8th graders scored “below basic” in reading. The picture for writing is even worse: two-thirds of 8th grade students and three quarters of 12th graders score at “basic” or “below basic” in writing. This is a tragic situation that must be addressed, starting at pre-school and kindergarten. Take up the challenge!

Find out more and download the report here: To Improve Reading, Teach Writing (on the ASCD Inservice Blog)

Writing with a pencil is difficult…

pencilsWriting with a pencil is difficult……

You have to remember what the letters look like….

You have to draw the letters….

You  have to erase…

You have to copy over…

computer

Writing with a computer can make it easier…

You don’t have to draw the letters….just tap the right key.

You don’t have to erase…just delete and type over.

You don’t have to copy over…

You can read what you’ve written…

The text always goes from left to right…

Why not start with writing?

Writing is a system humans have invented to make speech visible.

Our English alphabet is a way of drawing sounds.

typing

Words must be written before they can be read.

Why not start with writing?

Your First Grader Can Write!

Kasey writesFirst graders can write!  And what’s more they WANT to write!  The story below by Kasey, age 6, is a marvelous example, (produced in the Read, Write & Type lab at her school in Los Altos, California).

Writing is a way to learn how to think.  As E.M. Forester once said “How can I know what I think until I see what I say?” As children put their ideas on paper, they have to figure out what they know, what they believe, and what they feel. As they read what they write, the ideas are changed and perfected. The earlier they start learning this process, the earlier they will develop their ability to express ideas clearly and thoughtfully.

Writing came before reading when it was first invented.  Writing comes before reading as a natural way to begin to understand words on paper.  It is the writer who creates words for the reader to read.  It is the writer who initiates the action—who chooses the words, generates the ideas, and actively shapes the meaning of the message.  It is the writer who sees the “big picture” but who, at the same time, must assemble the whole message one piece at a time from individual sounds and letters.  Children can read without writing, but they cannot write without reading.

Children learn best by putting their ideas about the world into their own words and by telling (or writing) about them.  Getting feedback from an audience is a good way to learn whether or not their ideas make sense.

Writing makes ideas visible.  Once ideas are captured in print, children can read them over and over and think about them.  They can show their ideas to others.  As they revise their work, they become more confident about what they know, what they believe, and who they are.

“Plants grow from a seed and roots.

We grow from food and water and love.

Anamas grow from food and water.

Love grows from fathe.

Drowings grow from a pencel or cran or makr.

A brane grows from lrning.

A stoey grows from an idea.”

-Kasey, First Grade